First job. Huge!


#1

Hello all. I’m brand new to pressure washing and have my first estimate to do. I was at the job and measured 80,000 sqft, 2 stories.(Not my idea for a first time job) I was wondering what kind of chemical to use as I can’t seem to find anything specific. Also what is a typical rate for square footage. I live in the Bemidji, Minnesota area. Any helpful tips or tricks are very much appreciated. Thank you.


#2

Maybe post some info about what you are cleaning, surface , equipment etc. Read for a few months and you should find enough info to get you started


#3

The surface is concrete and they would just like the mold and mildew removed. I don’t have much for equipment, just a 4.0gpm machine with 150ft of hose. The building does have water spigots all around it so a tank wouldn’t be necessary. They would like an estimate completed soon so I’m kinda rushing into this one. Thanks


#4

So I don’t really have experience, I’m in the research phase, but I wouldn’t take that job, with that equipment, and being my first estimate, and without knowing what chem to use, to be honest I’d be looking to land small vinyl siding house washes, but again, I’m not experienced


#5

You’re brand new into pressure washing and want to do that for your first job? Man you guys have a lot more confidence in yourselves than I do. If you’re just starting, you should be doing normal vinyl homes and driveways for a good while. You’re just starting, it’s like you’re going to college for your bio degree, but trying to do open heart surgery already. I’m bad at analogies but you get what I mean. Start small.


#6

That’s good advice. The original poster will be gone in a few days probably so I wouldn’t worry to much about it.


#7

This forum should work off hand gun laws There should be a 7 day waiting period before you can post.


#8

That’s a tough one to cut your teeth on especially with 4 gpm. This I just sent today and know already I have to split it between myself and another company. This is the entire property over a year with 8 gpms because I’m pretty well over doing huge projects all at once.

Lol doing your job with a 4 gpm will make you want to quit before you start.

Subcontract it out to a well known company. Carry buckets, pull hoses, stay out of the way, and take notes.


#9

@Glasssmithwc

Good thread to read:


#10

If you are in it already you need to sub that to a well known company in your area like squid said. Get them to quote it to you you take their bid and mark it up 10-20% to pocket for yourself and submit. Make sure the sub knows you will be on site with them learning the process.


#11

The first mistake that you are making is rushing to give the estimate. I usually don’t say this, but I would walk away. If you don’t have the experience, equipment, manpower or insurance, I would leave it. You could sub it out, but you would still be responsible for the outcome if things don’t go as planed.


#12

Thanks for the advice guys! I have been practicing on my investment properties (5) that have vinyl siding and some have 2 stories. The person that asked for a estimate is a good friend knowing that I just started getting into the business. He just told me that just doing the main entrance part of the building (4,700 sqft) since I said that I may not be equipped for a job of that size. As for the negative remarks on this post. Thank you! Your criticism only feeds my will and drive to go harder. I am a successful businessman owning a few other small businesses. So I’ve heard it all before and still continue to prove people wrong when they say i won’t make it.:wink:


#13

Most here want you to make it. Maybe we just need some refining on how to communicate that.


#14

I’m not trying to discourage you, I’m just saying, wait until the time is right to tackle a job of this size. Keep reading, researching and doing small jobs. 99% of the people on this forum started where you are at now, including me. Good luck!


#15

Couldnt agree more.


#16

Hi @Glasssmithwc,

I love your ambition Brad. And it is really important to push your boundaries and get out of your comfort zone. However, do it in smaller intervals. This job looks like “trying to run before you learn to walk”.

Even if you could get this done. I would also be concerned that you do not have the experience to price it properly and could find yourself in trouble.

As others have said, I do not recommend sub-contracting this gig if you do land the contract. You do not wan’t this job under the umbrella of your business if things go sideways.

Here is my recommendation (for what it’s worth): Find a local, experienced pressure washing company, and ask them if they would be interested in quoting this job. If the answer is yes, make it conditional on you being part of the process (fly-on-the-wall) and that you be paid to help on the job. But do not take this much responsibility on your own this early.

Or, prove me wrong buddy! I also would love to see a future post where you accomplished this and did a great job.

Good luck.


#17

My wife and I talked about this today. It’s very hard to communicate via text because, you can’t interpret a persons tone and automatically jump to defense sometimes. I enjoy being apart of this form and I do a ton of business, but I don’t come here to boast about it, I come here to give and receive valuable knowledge.


#18

Certainly! Myself included.


#19

Fact. We want you to learn to provide value without hurting yourself or anyone else so we can compete, get better, and all raise our prices across the board while pushing the $99 guy out of business.


#20

I wasn’t trying to bash the guy . It just seems like there are post every day that says.
I’ve New to Pressure washing
What do I use and what do I charge. Nothing else.
I just think if someone couldn’t post for a certain period of time they would be more likely to find the answer on there own or at least try. Likely when they can ask questions they will be in a way people can actually help