Temporary winterization?


#1

Weather here is fickle, one day a low of 22f and the next week rising into the 50’s.

I rolled my machine into the garage to keep the pump from freezing, what do you guys do with those trailer mounts in situations like this?


#2

Cover it up and put a 100w light in there.


#3

moving blanket over the pumps.
and a 20x30 tarp on top.


#4

Would it be a good idea to inject the pump with winterization oil if I only use the machine every couple weeks?


#5

If you can’t cover or put a heater near it you would probably be better blowing it out with air than fogging it with oil.


#6

Good idea, I’ll try that. Need to change the pump oil anyway.


#7

I meant to blow the air out of the head. You shouldn’t have to worry about the oil. Leave it be. Screw a Schrader valve into a bushing and use that to replace the brass plug on the intake. Then use air compressor to blow out pump, reel and lines.


#8

I gotcha, it’s been about 50 hours on the original pump oil, could use a service. Apparently it takes 30w non-detergent, will have to check Autozone on that.


#9

I know oreillys has it for sure. Shell brand


#10

After the intial break in change, pump oil is good for a long time. Change it about every 10 changes on the engine


#11

I have been running the Pure Guard ND-30 they carry for a couple of years now and it’s very robust. I’d recommend it in a heartbeat.


#12

Suck then blow


#13

As long as you have a system that works👍


#14

Would be perfect if I didn’t loose a almost a gallon of my mix everytime I push it back out. Five pancake coils to thank for that


#15

I spent the day plumbing my trailer rig to have a “winterizer” set-up. Ran a “T” off my tank, one direction goes to pump, other direction goes to a winterizer connection that I can connect a 5 gal tank with 0 degree windshield wiper fluid in it. Drain the tank, turn off the ball valve at the tank, turn on the ball valve to my winterizer line and run the windshield wiper fluid through the pump and hose in 5 minutes.
My plan is to fill my winterizer tank with red food color water and when I start up in a day or two, capture the windshield fluid into another tank to reuse - the red water will let me know when the water is through the line so to not get that in my winterizer fluid. It also helps that it took right at 5 gal to run through the pump,lines and bypass, so I know once I have 4 gal in the bucket I am close. I plan on losing 1 gal each time I do this. For me, worth the $5 loss to know for sure my pump and lines are protected.
Where I am at, historically we have 10-12 nights between now and March that we have sub 32 degree temps, so no long winterizing, but also not worth taking a chance if you can make your set-up efficient so that in 5 minutes you have your pump and lines full of 0 degree fluid so no worries.


#16

RV and marine antifreeze is probably a better option. It’s designed to inhibit corrosion. I’ve never heard of windshield wiper fluid being used. That stuff gets pulled through vinyl tubes thanks to a plastic pump.

RV and marine antifreeze is designed to run through steel and iron and brass and aluminum parts and it’s easily found in -75 degree. Just my two cents.


#17

Went to O’reilly’s and didn’t find the oil at first, guy had to look it up. They keep it in the back. Thanks for the suggestion!


#18

I’ll have to look into that Squid. I used the windshield fluid as it was referenced in several articles I read about winterizing your machine from what appear to be reputable sources (one was KEC and the other I want to say was from a thread on another forum that had quite a few long-term members validating the use). It was mainly a cost consideration, with the wiper fluid running $4 a gal verses $8 for antifreeze. If I am able to capture 80% of what I use each time, then the cost variable is only $4 a time which is negligible for the peace of mind knowing I won’t have any issues the morning after a freeze.


#19

From experience, 0 degree wiper fluid will cost you a pump. Back in the day before I had a shop, I would stop by jiffy lube and they would give me all the old antifreeze I wanted for free.


#20

You’re probably right. I’m not really sure if there’s any problem using it. I tend to be an over-maintainer and the benefit is worth the cost of RV antifreeze for me. Menards has it for $4/gallon. I get 3-4 nights out of 1 gallon by dumping it right into my tanks dump valve.