Emailing Property Management Companies


#1

I’m going to email A number of property management companies around town. Tell me what you think about this template email I made.

Good afternoon _____!

My name is Michael and I’m contacting you from Niagara Pressure Washing. I was reaching out to you to find out if you were in need of adding a power washing company to your contractor list. If so, I’d love to meet with you at your convenience about finding ways to help restore the beauty in your properties.

Meanwhile, if you would like more information about my company, feel free to contact me directly at the number below, or visit www.Niagarawashing.com, where you can see photos, videos, services, and contact information.

Thank you for taking your time out to read this, and I look forward to working with you in the future.

Michael Morgan
Owner
Niagara Pressure Washing
941-258-5387


#2

In the thank you line, remove “out” as it is not needed.

“I was reaching out…” should probably read, “I am reaching out…” as you are currently, not in the past.

“I’d love to meet with you at your convenience about finding…”. You need a comma between “you” and “at” and also between “convenience” and “about”.

Otherwise, everything looks pretty good. Sorry, I am a teacher full time and I am a grammar stickler.


#3

I appreciate that. A professional email needs to be grammatically correct.


#4

Use mail chimp, use a proffesional template. Stress the convenience factor, just tell them about your company and what you can offer. Don’t try and sound like your asking a girl to high school prom.

I can send you a link of my email template through mailchimp if you want. You’ll have to create an account before you can see it. It’s free though


#5

Cool I’ll set it up. Thanks man


#6

Let me know if the link doesn’t work


#7

Would change to “that we may help you in maintaining your properties to a high level”

I seriously doubt that a company that manages a bunch of various properties has ever considered how beautiful they were. Also, it sounds like you think their properties look like crap now.


#8

I see what you mean. I put it that way because it’s part of my company tagline. I can see why it would look that way.


#9

As a second job, I coordinate all the maintenance for a property management company. We manage roughly 150 properties for individual owners. Property management companies that manage single family homes (not HOA management) either break even or lose money on maintenance if not doing it in house. So they need to be able to make money off of all the vendors they use. They are usually very loyal to their vendors.
Ask them if/what problems they are having with their current vendor.
The best way to get their attention is to offer the first service for free (Up to $200-300). That will allow them to take a risk on a new company and make some money in the process. Then you do a great job and discuss future price ranges on the types of properties they manage.


#10

Why should the vendor work for free…

Seems they need to charge the owner a slightly higher management fee to cover the maintenance of THEIR property.


#11

My point is that property managers are loyal to the vendors they currently use. A 1 house wash demo for the chance to get their business only costs the pressure washing company $50


#12

I am not talking about HOA management for condo or apt associations. I’m talking about management of properties for individual owners. Those types of maintenance costs are never included in the management fees.


#13

I’m familiar with HOA’s because we live in a subdivision that has one. (Although, we’re no upscale subdivision and they don’t enforce most of the rules and regulations) Anyways, what exactly does the property management company do in order to make enough money to where they’re okay with breaking even or even losing money in maintenance? What all are they responsible for besides maintenance? I’m not familiar with how they operate. Now that I think about it I’m guessing they are all rental properties? If so, why not increase the rent to make up for the costs of maintenance or require the tenants to take care of basic cleaning? Most rentals around here require the tenants to mow the lawn, snow removal, etc.

If they lose money on maintenance I bet the odds are pretty good that most hire the $99 guy.


#14

I understand your point with that…thanks.

My point was…why is it not the responsibility of the property owner to pay for maintenance on their property?

If the management company does not include it in the fee…why not just bill the owner for it?

And, why should the contractor have to work cheaper so the management company can make money off them?

The vendor is the only one getting screwed in this deal.


#15

I can’t imagine the property management company isn’t billing the owners later on, and work not performed with out their consent. Most rental house property management companies only make about $100 a month per unit. Maybe he’s just confused


#16

Yes. Talking about rental properties. Tenants are responsible for basic maintenance and upkeep. But you don’t want Joe Blow Tenant blasting the crap out of your biggest investment. So the owner takes that responsibility.

The property management companies are definitely making good profit overall.

The owners do approve and are billed for any maintenance whether it is completed by the management company’s in house maintenance employees or if it is contracted out.

Management companys with in house maintenance are generally a HUGE ripoff to the property owner. They tend to way over charge for extremely sub par quality.

Management companys without in house maintenance are more attractive to property owners because the companies hire trusted professional vendors to complete any maintenance with a small mark up. In this case, it is a bit of a loss leader to employ someone that is solely responsible for scheduling maintenance, managing vendors, completing inspection, etc. This is why they are loyal to their trusted vendors. The vendors are not working for any less money. The owner doesn’t have to use them if they don’t want pay the quoted costs. They are free to hire whoever they want.

A 1 house demo is an extremely small cost for the potential to become that trusted vendor.


#17

Thanks for the explanation. That definitely clears up my questions.

If you have the chance to get your foot in the door of something like that it would be well worth doing a demo for free. Most spend a lot more than that in marketing when trying to acquire customers. There’s a chance if you get in good with a large property management company you might not even have to search out new customers and you could save a ton in marketing expenses.


#18

Mind sharing link with me pls.


#19

Thanks for this information helpful guys. I am fairly new to the pressure washing industry and looking to increase my customer base.I am 28 years old and have up to 10 years of experience and decided to branch of and start my own LLC. I most definitely needed this conversation because I myself am trying/ going to attract Property Management.

Is their a conversation on here where you guys discuses how to increase customer/ bid/ PM/ HOA ect…

What are some ways that i can reach out to these groups. I am located in South Florida.

Thanks!


#20

Search “hoa pool house”