Oxidation removal Cleansol BC

I tried oxidation removal again using the BC Cleansol. This time on a vinyl siding mobile home. We did the 4:1 initial dilution and down streamed 10:1. Maybe it needs to be brushed off? Should I apply it stronger? Is it supposed to all look darker after the chalky oxidation is fully removed? See pics. Thanks in advance.

Wet vinyl first, apply your 4:1 mixture via downstream, wait 5 minutes or so apply a second coat, wait 5 minutes or so and rinse well. You shouldn’t need to brush, maybe here and there in some cases. I like using warm water too.

2 Likes

What he said above, apply a second coat…sometimes 3 coats. Give it some dwell time between applications…don’t let it dry before rinsing

1 Like

Sheesh, just spray some Britenol on it and rinse and be gone. Or could probably downstream the One Restore too.

I think once perfected, oxidation removal can be a good high dollar restoration job in the off season. Double or triple charge of a house wash.

1 Like

CleansolBC is usually what you hear people say for oxidation but I’ve also seen the other side of the spectrum with acids being used such as f9 barc and now britenol.

Do acids work better then the bases/degreasers for
A brushless oxidation removal? My only concern is downstreaming it on glass windows and aluminum frames. What do you think?

We applied once, dwelled, applied twice, dwelled and then rinsed. Then tried a third time using a much stronger mix (spray bottle 5:1 after initial dilution). Worked a little more but still way splotchy. I’ll have another go at it, I just thought maybe bc wasn’t all it was cracked up to be. Thanks everyone. @Racer ill order Britenol Monday to try that too.

Should oxidation removal even be a thing? You are essentially removing paint, and the paint left behind will just oxidize again very quickly. I always identify oxidized paint to the home owner and refer them to a painter. Seems to me their money is better spent fixing the problem the right way.

1 Like

Oxidation removal is essentially a can of worms that should never be opened…

3 Likes

I have nothing to add, but just want to note that it’s Cleansol BC, not BC Cleansol, haha.

@Seandz ive had trouble getting that to work great too. Applied the initial 4:1 multiple applications, even scrubbed couple times. I just can’t get it to look great. I save cleansol for odd stains and tiger striping, works great on those.

1 Like

Many people want an easy spray on a rinse off product. Understand this, sometimes you need to put some work into it. Look like you need to brush it. This is why you let the customer know that it will cost more than a house wash to remove it. My advice is get a brush a get to work. If this is a two story, I feel for ya!

You know you are scrubbing off paint right?

I use my hydrofluoric wheel cleaner on window frames and glass literally almost every day to get rid of mud stains. Just don’t let dry and rinse well. Usually in only on for a few minutes.

1 Like

I don’t know what kind of vinyl you have up there, but vinyl down here is the same color all the way through. Oxidation is a chemical reaction with the pvc resin in the vinyl. Has nothing to do with the color. You can clean the oxidation off 50 times and it’s still the same color. Your doing a serious disservice to your customers if you’re telling them to get their vinyl houses re-painted because of oxidation.

Gutters are a different story because they do have paint on them, usually baked on, but still paint.

3 Likes

I removed oxidation once on 3 sides of a large vinyl home. I just two stepped with quicksilver (hydrofloric acid) and grizzly (degreaser). Didn’t take very long at all and no brushing. Granted, hydrofloric is a completely different ballgame than eacochem stuff.

2 Likes

Totally get that. Being I am so new to this aspect (oxidation removal) the results look like we made it worse. Is it possible to completely remove all of it using 3 applications when needed brushing just the stubborn areas?

The difference is vinyl vs aluminum.

I disagree. There is a shelf life on everything.

With vinyl it’s about 50+ years. With good care can last much longer. But older than that would probably be a better idea to replace versus paint

2 Likes