Orange appearance of Lueders Limestone


#21

I don’t, read the answer again


#22

I am going to call Prosoco. They offer a ton of products. Seems like this is an area I need to improve on.
Racer are you suggesting sodium hydroxide to clean? And then an acid, like citric or vinegar or oxalic to neutralize?
I don’t have hot water but could rent it if necessary.


#23

Yes, pre-wet, SHydrox or SHypo, rinse, Ox or Citric, rinse, walk away with money.


#24

Fine, now I can’t read on top of everything else… I should probably not look at this stuff at 11:30 at night too.


#25

That’s main ingredient of their limestone cleaner. But since the one you were working on wasn’t that bad, I would have used mainly bleach with maybe a little hydroxide as a kicker.

One Restore makes a product too that may be a little more user friendly. Some of the Prosoco stuff is pretty strong and oriented towards really bad historic buildings.


#26

The topic of Sodium hydroxide vs sodium Hypochlorite hasn’t been covered all that much. I think I reach for SH way too much.
Prosoco has a ton of products. I called them the other day and had a good thirty minute call chatting about their chemicals. They gave me the number of their local Rep to get some free samples.


#27

Good John. That’s the best way to research and learn about some great products out there. Kind of the fun part on tackling new projects for me.

Here is a great resource for you:
https://www.gsa.gov/real-estate/historic-preservation/historic-preservation-policy-tools/preservation-tools-resources/technical-documents.

I often quote the GSA guidelines sometimes if I bidding a historic building.


#28

Thanks for sharing! There is a lot of great information there.


#29

This is like the textbook I have been looking for. You sir get a like for this one.


#30

y, lot of good info in there.