Walk away or wash away?

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I’m thinking about soft washing it just like a roof but rinsing it down really good after I let it sit for a while.

Haven’t had time to do a test spot so if if it will discolor that material.

walk away

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They might not be satisfied no matter how good a job you do :confused:

Id walk unless it was a mid-high 4 figure job and they really had they’re expectations firmly based in this reality.

I did a nasty tennis court recently, hadn’t been used in years.

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Don’t try to softwash that, a low/medium pressure surface cleaning Is what worked with mine. Heavy pretreat, sucker took me all afternoon. Rinsing was the worst part, cleaning takes off a fine layer of sand and is a bear to get off.

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That really needs to be replaced. It’s rotted, any pressure will probably shred it.

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Run away unless they’re cleaning so it can be repaired. Could break an ankle you step in that hole you show if you were playing. Charge plenty, going to take forever to rinse that sucker.

Anyone know what that top layer is?

Jobs like that are great because anything will look better then it does now.

Heavy pre soap
Low pressure surface clean
Heavy rinsing.

Do a quick test spot. It will take 5 min and you will have your answer.

That court is shot out anyway. If you can bring any life back to it at all, Im sure they will be thrilled.

I say wash away…

I told her it needed to be resurfaced and any pressure even low pressure could make some spots worse. She said resurfacing cost a fortune and the main thing she is worried about is how slippery it is.

I told her I’d swing by in 2/weeks to do a test spot. She said the same as you. Couldn’t get worse lol

I’ll likely pass on this one though. I’d still like to do a test spot for my own curiosity.

Oh one more thing.

When I was rinsing, I found the best method was to use my HP fan on my jrod and sweep the court across like a typewriter. Before I figured that out, the first rinse I did left a bunch of sand behind once it dried.

Also bring a leafblower.

Update: I went out and did a test spot last weekend and she was thrilled I didn’t even rinse well just with a 5gallon bucket. I told her thats the best I could do with the condition it’s in and gave her I price of $1800. That includes throwing those leafs and sticks over the fence (my helpers job).

My plans are to do a larger test spot and let the mix sit for 10mins and see what it will look like on a larger scale and if it’s good then I’m going to wash away.

3% sh and rinse. Sounds easy enough we will see.

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I made sure to let her know that the court was already to far gone and that she needed a new surface. She knows this and said anything would be better than what it is now. She’s mainly concerned about how slick it is with all the algae on it. She agrees that it will not all come off and understands that it was neglected for way to long.

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Man, I tried that in my job and it didn’t flinch. Years of dirt buildup. Oh and you mentioned slick, I almost busted my backside several times when we pretreated that sucker. Careful!

Look who’s a free man… @DisplacedTexan

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This is one of the best things to be able to do with customers. Set expectations and make sure you are on the same page. I’m sure it will be far better than it’s current condition.

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Just the tennis court or did you upsell on the nasty block paving ? :rofl:

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Nice to see you back my fellow Marine. I was just thinking about you a few days ago. I hope life is treating you and yours well.

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thank you ! nice to be back, missed all you guys, been very busy the last month since the country opened back up, its light here from 05:30 up to near 22:00 so had many long days making up for lost time !

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