Paint stripping

Never a fun job, everytime I do one I say never again. This deck had three coats of some paint, had to be stripped and scraped twice with soy gel, then washed twice and sanded heavily. That is a 5 gallon bucket full of stripped paint. Pressure washing without scraping will send paint pieces 40 feet in every direction so we try to get as much up as possible. Here are some pictures of the progress. One coat of tan paint on top and two coats of blue/gray underneath

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Nice to see wood though!

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Nice work Charles. I am anxious to attend your class in August.

Beneath those slopped on layers of paint are beautiful wood grains screaming to be seen. Looks great! I may have to go to that class as well.

3 hour job tops. Lol

[MENTION=7076]ApexDeckSavers[/MENTION]
when you bid on a job like this, how do you price it. 2-3 times your normal rate?

[MENTION=7076]ApexDeckSavers[/MENTION]
when you bid on a job like this, how do you price it. 2-3 times your normal rate?

I understand your pain Charles. Would looks even more like a Pita to strip than concrete though! Not fun.

[MENTION=7076]ApexDeckSavers[/MENTION]
What is your “go to” gel?

[MENTION=7076]ApexDeckSavers[/MENTION]
What is your “go to” gel?

Hey Tim, in this case I used a product called Soy Gel. I don’t think its the best, but I haven’t used many others to be able to compare. The nice thing is it is safe to use so you can touch it with bare hands and not worry about it burning you like some heavy paint strippers. The soy gel is supposed to be about to cut through multiple layers of paint, normally what I find is the first coat starts to bubble up and the gel soaks in so I just scrape off what I can and put more soy gel down.

This job was $6.00/square foot which I believe was too low. Ended up being a lot harder once we got into the job, lot of cracks and crevices that were holding the paint and needed heavy sanding. Not sure I’ll bid another paint job this year, busy enough with regular work thankfully.

Quick question guys! Need some words of wisdom. Pressure washed a deck let it dry. Now gonna apply linseed oil. Well turns out the weather did not choose to cooperate. The application of Linseed oil went fine but 12 hours later it got rained on. Grrrr. I have gotten all of the water off it. Just a few small spots left on it. Any suggestions. Anybody had this happen to them. It is drying and does look like three days of sun in the upper 70s. Thanks in advance.

Did you just use boiled linseed oil straight?

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Yes it was boiled linseed oil straight.

Got a customer that’s want this porch stripped. Just several coats of stain. What kinda prices would you suggest?



[MENTION=7076]ApexDeckSavers[/MENTION]

Sometime you should check out MySupplier.US in North Carolina they have two professional manuals for $20.00 that tells about the process of stripping paints and coatings from decks. They also have some awesome products including SoyGel.

We no longer strip paint at all. It seems no matter what you bid you wish it was more. I would bid repainting surface or floor replacement
The time taken on some of these “high suck factor” projects you could be doing more profitable ones. Painted decks is very low percentage of wood care.

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apex deck savers

excellent work…what does your classes entail…where are they being held and when…?

with paint stripping is it a matter of letting your chemicals work for you…or the physical scrapping or pressure applied? or does it depends on the type of surface…?

I know this is an old thread…but here goes.

I am in the middle of the exact situation. Deck and porch both with two layers of paint. I pressured washed no problem. I applied stripper 4 times! the paint still would not come off. Spent most of today sanding the deck and have about 4 more hours of sanding the porch. Only priced it at $2 sq ft. I should have gone much higher. Lesson learned, wont be making that mistake again! Needless to say, I have lost some money on this job, but have learned a valuable lesson.