Favorite stripper

I’d like to know what some of you prefer for strippers… I’m looking to try some new thangs in the chem dept…
I got a deck job coming up and I’m taking off that rubbery stuff that adheres to the wood. It kind of reminds me of like a bed liner type texture. I’ve only really seen it at older peoples homes, because it keeps them from slipping when the wood is wet.
Just looking to see what some of you other fine people are doing for similar stuff and what works good for you.
Thanks in advance for any input. Hope you’re all staying safe, happy, and healthy !

Are you talking about Deckover? @Dirtyboy has some THREADS FOR YOU!

Also I’m partial to Candy myself :rofl: :joy:

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That could very well be what I’m thinking of @TexasPressureWashing
I figure theres gotta be something that works good for that… I’d rather do it the right way, than go in with cold water and high pressure like a newb cowboy, jangle leg swinging lol.

My favourite one said she was stripping to feed her kids, but then got pissed off at me when I started throwing canned food at her.

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@MuscleMyHustle it’s only fun when she’s crying :man_shrugging::joy:

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Well that escalated quickly😂

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What no pictures? :triumph:

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Hi, most people on here that strip decks use either hydroxide sodium or potassium. They are almost the same, potassium costs a bit more though. You can google it to see what the internet wizards say is the big difference. You can mix stuff into hydroxide to make it thicker and not run off the verticals.

That rubbery stuff could be anything from actual bed liner, to paint with grit added, to a number of various manufacturer’s of acrylic latex (non slip) paints. THey just make it thicker basically. YOu can lift paint with various naps of covers and some specialty roller covers to geive it a texture. People add everything from sand to walnut shells into paint to give it traction.

IF they only have one application down, and they know what they put down, it may not be too difficult to take off. too many variables to know. You can talk to the wood masters on this forum to get some ideas. I would take a look at it, but then again I am a glutton for punishment (married awhile). A lot of the non slip manufacturer’s are recommending 2 coats for one application.

I looked into it for my mother’s deck, because she is old. We bought rubber treads for the steps instead.

Oh, and her name is Kandy :smiley:

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@Dirtyboy I read your thread and I’m glad @TexasPressureWashing showed it to me… the customer called me back and I explained some of my concerns. She said the person who put it on the deck didnt do a very good job and that its peeling in spots. Might only have one coat on there. I’m thinking if the small machine takes it off with just a little pressure, maybe it might not be the nightmare we all think its gonna be ? Lol.

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@Dirtyboy also she said its only been on there a year. And the product has since been discontinued. So I’m guessing it may be worth taking a look at it at least. I also seem to be a glutton for punishment. Hahaha.

I mean if you’ve got the time and want the money sure. If you’re busy and it could delay you doing another job then I’d walk.

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@TexasPressureWashing yeah I decided against it. Trying to be a better version of myself this season… that would include not wasting my time with headache jobs lol !!

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Always growing is the way to be. One less headache is always good too!

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Agreed brotha ! Gonna bid on tons of big commercial jobs this year, so; “ain’t nobody got time fo dat” :joy::sob::sunglasses:

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I would suggest EaCo Chem AcrylicStrip or LCS. If it’s a layered up surface you might want to look into InStrip as an extended dwell product.